Snow Day Superstitions
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Snow Day Superstitions

Snow Day Superstitions
BY Emily Browning | Thursday, February 06, 2014
 
 


Katzya informed me there was indeed a sure fire way to get a snow day, but you must follow these instructions very carefully and in order!

She was bouncing through the kitchen on her way to her bedroom when I asked the dreaded parental question: “Do you have your homework done yet?”  My daughter stopped, spun around, and with a twinkle in her eye said: “No, don’t even worry about that.  We have tomorrow covered!”  It was then that I noticed her pajamas were on inside out.  I went back to washing the dishes, shook my head, and then said:  “Go to your room, finish your homework, and while you’re there fix your pajamas.  You have them on backwards and inside out!”  She rolled her eyes, chuckled under her breath, and went on to inform me that she would gladly finish her homework, but under no uncertain circumstances could she fix her pajamas.  She and her friends were all dressing like this to conjure up a snow day.  I had to laugh, and then asked her to please educate me on how this worked exactly. 

Katzya informed me there was indeed a sure fire way to get a snow day, but you must follow these instructions very carefully and in order!  It works best if an entire group of people do it together, hence her entire 8th grade class is doing this in unison, and it must be done on a night when there is a possibility of snow in the forecast. 

1)       You must flush 4 ice cubes down the toilet.  This is a snow day ritual that is supposed to signify a “cold front” to the snow gods.

2)       You must put 6 ice cubes in a bowl, place it in the center of the kitchen floor, and chant “snow day” while listening to Vanilla Ice sing Ice, Ice Baby.  (Think of it as a modern day Indian rain dance…)

3)      You must wear your pajamas inside out AND backwards.  (This is done to confuse the snow gods or the parents.)  Supposedly whoever dons the inside out and backwards pajamas is promptly delivered a snow day by the snow gods.

4)      You must sleep with a spoon under your pillow!  It doesn’t matter if the spoon is made of wood, plastic, or metal, but one thing is for sure:  No spoon, no snow day!

When my daughter explained all of this snow day superstition to me, I laughed and immediately hit up the internet to do a little research.  I was surprised to find out, she and her friends were not alone.  Evidently these snow day rituals are common place nowadays, and kids all over the central portion of the United States actually participate in this phenomenon.  Now, I’m not going to say if I believe in this snow day superstition nonsense or not, but I am requesting that after the month of February, any and all teenage negotiations with the snow gods STOP!  

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About Emily Browning

On The Urban Farm

Emily is a native of Tipp City, where she lives with her partner (The Reluctant Farmer) and teenage daughter. Together they have created an urban homestead, living off food produced right from their own backyard.

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