10 Thought-Provoking Quotes from TEDxDayton 2018
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10 Thought-Provoking Quotes from TEDxDayton 2018

10 Thought-Provoking Quotes from TEDxDayton 2018
Lauren Rinehart   Saturday, October 27, 2018

In its 6th year, TEDxDayton once again delivers on its promise of spreading ideas worth sharing.

10 Thought-Provoking Quotes from TEDxDayton 2018

TEDx DaytonWith a roster of 21 Dayton-based speakers, artists, and performers TEDxDayton 2018 engaged the audience once more – spurring conversations, sparking new ideas and perspectives, and spreading ideas worth sharing.  These speakers moved the crowd to tears and to laughter as well as generating some highly quotable talks.  Here are 10 of the thought-provoking quotes from TEDxDayton 2018.

“While everyone is entitled to their own opinions, no one is entitled to their own facts.”

TEDxDayton 2018 kicked off with a timely talk by journalist Ray Marcano, who urged the audience to check facts before forming opinions by using fact checking resources such as Politifact, Factcheck.org, and Snopes to name a few.  He warned of the danger of tribalism as a result of our 24 hour content cycle and explained that “While everyone is entitled to their own opinions, no one is entitled to their own facts.”

“The opposite of addiction is not sobriety, but connection.”

Dayton has received a lot of national media attention for being at the epicenter of the opioid epidemic.  Artist Tiffany Clark spoke about her trials and triumphs as she has battled her own addiction, putting a human face to the issues our city grapples with.  She explains that with ever-increasing rates of depression in the US “Addiction is just a byproduct of our nation’s sadness” and adds that “The opposite of addiction is not sobriety, but connection.”

“you may learn things that make you uncomfortable but I survived and so will you.”

Self-described “submarine mom” Elizabeth Horner discussed her and her family’s experiences after her child came out as transgendered at the age of 16.  She encouraged other parents of trans teens to be open with their children, even if you are unfamiliar with these issues because “you may learn things that make you uncomfortable but I survived and so will you.”

“By standing in front of you today, I am breaking my silence – I’m no longer a victim. I am a survivor.”

In one of the most moving talks of the afternoon, John-Michael Lander describes his experiences with childhood sexual abuse in the world of competitive diving.  He explains that he attempted to get help while it was happening but the adults in his life failed him – even his own parents said that everyone has to make sacrifices rather than getting him away from the professionals and coaches who were abusing him.  In an emotional affirmation, John-Michael asserts that “By standing in front of you today, I am breaking my silence – I’m no longer a victim. I am a survivor.”

"Be true to yourself - give yourself permission to fail but not to give up."

Legal rainmaker, Barbara Duncomb overcame gender discrimination in her career and attributes her success to learning to trust herself.  Using skills and traits commonly attributed to women, she was able to earn the trust of clients as well.  She instructed the TEDxDayton audience to "Be true to yourself - give yourself permission to fail but not to give up."

"Time flies and I won't waste it."

Performing his poem entitled "Everchanging," poet and high school senior, Shawn Gardner, invoked this year's TEDxDayton motif by describing how life continuously 'shifts' and changes.  And while the passing of time is unavoidable, Gardner asserted that "Time flies and I won't waste it." 

"Once human, forever human."

Entrepreneur Adam Sobol developed CareBand, a technology company that designs wearable devices for seniors living with dementia, helping patients live safer, more independent lives.  He explained that despite the inclination some people have to label dementia patients as experiencing "the living death," they are still human and deserve dignity.  He quoted Dr. Mary Radnofsky's words "Once human, forever human."

"How many towels do you need?"

While staring at her linen closet, Rose Lounsbury started her journey toward minimalism by asking one simple question: "How many towels do you need?"  Despite its simplicity, this question led Lounsbury to start thinking about all of the excess stuff we keep in our homes, starting a chain reaction that in 8 months resulted in a lighter, happier life for her and her family.

"I no longer allow anyone to assign a value to me, do that."

In a deeply moving talk about her struggle with self-worth, radio personality Faith Daniels shared the thoughts that she faced while attempting suicide.  In the bleak moments leading up to her decision, she contemplated her children, her husband, her mother, and then realized that she wanted to stay alive for herself first and foremost.  Despite being at such a low point in her life, she decided that "I no longer allow anyone to assign a value to me, I do that."

"There's beauty all around us all the time just waiting to be discovered."

Finishing out the incredible line up of speakers this year was non-photographer Adam Alonzo.  Claiming to be just a man who once bought an expensive camera, Alonzo has made it a point to get his money's worth by taking photos every day and loading the top five daily to his website.  He encouraged the audience to get out and explore because "There's beauty all around us all the time just waiting to be discovered."

In its 6th year, TEDxDayton once again delivers on its promise of spreading ideas worth sharing.  Videos of the 2018 presentations will be posted online in the near future. 

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About Lauren Rinehart

Girl About Dayton

Girl About Dayton (Lauren Rinehart) is a blog about a girl living, working, eating, and shopping in Dayton, Ohio.

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